March162014

silversarcasm:

When watching a show I don’t think ‘Well politically correctly there should be two more minorities’

I’m thinking ‘This is suffocating, this isn’t what life is like, why do i not exist, why do my friends not exist, what the fuck is with this idealisation of one type of person?’


 

(via cutestfatty)

6PM
be-blackstar:

girlannachronism:

Thom Browne fall 2014 rtw backstage

THIS IS NOT THOM BROWNE’S, THIS IS NOT “LORDE-INSPIRED” 
East African women (and probably other women from that region of the world) have BEEN dying their fingertips 

be-blackstar:

girlannachronism:

Thom Browne fall 2014 rtw backstage

THIS IS NOT THOM BROWNE’S, THIS IS NOT “LORDE-INSPIRED” 

East African women (and probably other women from that region of the world) have BEEN dying their fingertips 

February42014
sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool


 

(via faineemae)

January242014
“You’re drunk in a bathtub
with a red cup full of Birthday Cake flavored vodka
wearing a headdress
made of neon Dollar Store chicken feathers.
You’re half naked in a grassy field
with drugstore lipstick smeared under your eyes
dropping acid
and wearing moccasins from Urban Outfitters.
You can’t wait for Coachella
so you can finally smoke a peace pipe in a tepee
and find your Spirit Animal.
You think Native American culture is so beautiful
and clumsily show it with your
hashtags on tumblr and Instagram.
But when actual Indigenous people tell you that
Gypsy, Squaw and Red Injun are all racist slurs
Headdresses are sacred
and war paint on your white face is insulting
You say
“I’m just appreciating your beautiful culture!
I’m 1/16th Cherokee.”
Ignoring the fact that running around
naked in the woods on shrooms
will not connect you with any tribe
and that your great great great great grandmother
along with the rest of the Cherokee people
never wore headdresses.” "1/16th Cherokee" by sumblr (via calamityjaneporter)

(Source: ursulamisandress, via cutestfatty)

January182014
December42013

youngblackandvegan:

thechanelmuse:

Vanessa VanDyke has amazing hair. Point blank. But it’s her hair that may cause her to get expelled from school. Faith Christian Academy in Orlando told the 12-year-old that she has a week to decide if she’s going to cut her hair, straighten it, or get kicked out.

Vanessa has attended Faith Christian Academy since she was in the third grade, but the school’s s code has rules against how students can wear their hair. The handbook reads: “Hair must be a natural color and must not be a distraction,” and goes on to state examples that include, but are not limited to, mohawks, shaved designs and rat tails.

The distraction that the school is probably referring to when it speaks of Vanessa’s hair has to do with bullying and teasing.

From Local 10 News Orlando:

“A distraction to one person is not a distraction to another,” said VanDyke’s mother, Sabrina Kent. “You can have a kid come in with pimples on his face. Are you going to call that a distraction?”

VanDyke said she’s had her large, natural hair all year long, but it only became an issue after the family complained about students teasing her about her hair.

“There have been bullies in the school,” said Kent. “There have been people teasing her about her hair, and it seems to me that they’re blaming her.”

“I’m depressed about leaving my friends and people that I’ve known for a while, but I’d rather have that than the principals and administrators picking on me and saying that I should change my hair,” said VanDyke.

Source.

(via yellowxperil)

October182013
August132013
1AM
1AM
1AM
“decolonization
requires
acknowledging.
that your
needs and desires
should
never
come at the expense of anothers
life energy.
it is being honest
that
you have been spoiled
by a machine
that
is not feeding you freedom,
but
feeding
you
the milk of pain.” our work, nayyirah waheed

(Source: nayyirahwaheed, via nayyirahwaheed)

July182013
queerandbrown:

On the Saturday night acquittal of George Zimmerman, a group of queer black women in Pittsburgh called for a community gathering to recognize the injustice of the verdict. I created this image on Sunday morning from pain, tears and frustration over Trayvon Martin’s senseless murder. The posters and t-shirts generated were printed to share with the people of Pittsburgh who condemn the not guilty verdict of George Zimmerman and to express solidarity with every black victim of injustice.
On Monday afternoon I posted a photograph of posters and t-shirts to our blog and received over a thousand reblogs, likes and sales inquiries. Although I view this response as an affirmation of dissatisfaction with the verdict, I do not want to profit from this injustice. My stance is a rejection of a white supremacist capitalist system in which profit could be made from a black person’s death. This image is not for sale. Rather, I want to share it under a Creative Commons license which allows you to freely copy, distribute and transmit the image. You may not use this image for commercial purposes. You may not alter, transform or build upon this image. If you distribute this image online please attribute it to: www.queerandbrown.com.
Click here for a high-resolution PDF file.
The image I’ve created references Aura Bogado’s brilliant article, White Supremacy Acquits George Zimmerman. In it Bogado speaks to the ideology of white supremacy that taught Zimmerman that suspicious black men in his neighborhood were automatically “assholes who always get away.” I encourage the hundreds of Tumblr users who have reblogged, liked or commented on my image to read it.
Ayanah, on behalf of Q&B

queerandbrown:

On the Saturday night acquittal of George Zimmerman, a group of queer black women in Pittsburgh called for a community gathering to recognize the injustice of the verdict. I created this image on Sunday morning from pain, tears and frustration over Trayvon Martin’s senseless murder. The posters and t-shirts generated were printed to share with the people of Pittsburgh who condemn the not guilty verdict of George Zimmerman and to express solidarity with every black victim of injustice.

On Monday afternoon I posted a photograph of posters and t-shirts to our blog and received over a thousand reblogs, likes and sales inquiries. Although I view this response as an affirmation of dissatisfaction with the verdict, I do not want to profit from this injustice. My stance is a rejection of a white supremacist capitalist system in which profit could be made from a black person’s death. This image is not for sale. Rather, I want to share it under a Creative Commons license which allows you to freely copy, distribute and transmit the image. You may not use this image for commercial purposes. You may not alter, transform or build upon this image. If you distribute this image online please attribute it to: www.queerandbrown.com.

Click here for a high-resolution PDF file.

The image I’ve created references Aura Bogado’s brilliant article, White Supremacy Acquits George Zimmerman. In it Bogado speaks to the ideology of white supremacy that taught Zimmerman that suspicious black men in his neighborhood were automatically “assholes who always get away.” I encourage the hundreds of Tumblr users who have reblogged, liked or commented on my image to read it.

Ayanah, on behalf of Q&B

(Source: queerandbrown, via glasscoffin)

July72013
“do you think
calling me “angry”
is an insult.
every time you call me “angry”
i hear your voice salt with guilt
and
i laugh.
look how easy it is to reveal you.” anger is a healthy and natural response to oppression, nayyirah waheed (via nayyirahwaheed)

(via nayyirahwaheed)

12AM
June182013

My bloodline is split. Peruvian and German. On my father’s side, we can trace genetic history as far back as the Germanic dynasty of Hanover(diverging by patrilineal rule from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, also known as the ruling house of Windsor in Britain). On my mother’s side, I have no definite history other than oral tradition. It is suggested that some of my ancestors are Jewish and Rroma peoples emigrating to the Americas to avoid persecution in Spain. If this is true, then they appear to have been quickly assimilated into the Spanish Empire, which would of course include European Spaniards and the conquered Quechua (Inca) people. On my mother’s side, it’s all guess work. On my mother’s side, my family history has been paved over by Spanish Colonialism. I was raised to think of myself as “American”, mostly because my parents thought it would make life easier for me. I have never claimed whiteness, but my history has been white-washed. I was raised in a white culture, but made incredibly aware that I am not white every time I have been asked — “So what are you?” “You some kind of Mexican?” “You got Injun in you?” — or told I “must be a beaner” or called a “squaw” by a white person. In turn, I have never been fully accepted as “brown enough”. I have no connection with anyone who shares similar descent. My tribal ancestors are extinct. I have no cultural identity. The way I am dismissed or rejected altogether based on my racial appearance is confusing and isolating. I am reminded of it every day. I am a hybrid and a freak and other.

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