August112014

First they’ll criticize our slang. Make us seem uneducated for using it, when the reality is they’re mad we can code switch. Then they’ll use our slang mockingly. Like they really don’t want to use it, but it’s so absurd they can’t help themselves. Then they’ll make money off our slang, t-shirts, cups, bracelets, etc. Then they’ll convince us it was never really ours. It’s been public domain forever.

Feel free to replace the word “Slang” with neighborhoods, and music too.

(via jawnsbejawnin)

(via nayyirahwaheed)

July152014
“In a colorblind society, White people, who are unlikely to experience disadvantages due to race, can effectively ignore racism in American life, justify the current social order, and feel more comfortable with their relatively privileged standing in society (Fryberg, 2010). Most minorities, however, who regularly encounter difficulties due to race, experience colorblind ideologies quite differently. Colorblindness creates a society that denies their negative racial experiences, rejects their cultural heritage, and invalidates their unique perspectives.” Monica Williams, Ph.D for Psychology Today, “Colorblind Ideology is a Form of Racism” (via confusedtree)

(Source: popularslutclub, via yellowxperil)

9AM
July82014
“First…. Many Indigenous Nations have calendars which have
been counting the years for a very long time. I am aware that
the calendar of the Mohawk Indian Nation has been counting
the winters for over 33,120 years. This pre-dates the so-called
‘land-bridge’ of the Bering Strait theory, unless, of course, the
Bering Strait scientists decide to move their interestingly illusive
time period for “early migration” of Indians back to 40,000 years!
Many American Indian early histories tell of events that took
place on this Turtle continent (North America) long before any
so-called ice age. But, for political reasons, these histories
have been mostly ignored. You see, the Bering Strait, in truth,
is a theory that was born of the politics and propaganda of
early America. In the midst of the American ‘Manifest Destiny’
social climate, the Bering Strait theory provided a ‘scientific’
means to justify the taking of ancestral Indian lands. In short,
the mythical theory eased the conscience, as it was a way for
land hungry immigrants to believe that, because Indian people
were only ‘recent inhabitants’ of this land , it was not really their
‘homeland’. Therefore Indians were, in their minds, not any more
the ‘original people’ of this land than they were. This was, and
still is, the political power of the infamous ‘Bering Strait theory’.”

The B.S. (Bering Strait) Myth
By John Two-Hawks

The Bering Strait Theory was made to make colonialism seem less like exploitation.

(via fwoosh2)

Wow, definitely did not know this but definitely makes all of the sense in the world.  One thing I try to teach my students is that every piece of information was created by someone.  Whether it is numbers, words, or pictures they are all susceptible to the filters of people.  That, in conjunction with the our culture of racism (to say the least) means we must question everything.  

(via syrupysweet)

(Source: nativecircle.com, via salviaapiana)

July12014

hasmeenah:

primadollly:

kreyolcoco:

fabulazerstokill:

dynastylnoire:

THIS WAS THE FUNNIEST THING OF ALL THE SHOW 

Do they ever take the mom to task for not teaching her Spanish though ? I mean her mom is there.

There was literally nothing funny about this though?

^^^^ that scene hits me right in the *assimilated* child of an immigrant feels. Cause so many parents don’t teach their kids their native tongues (for various reasons) and it hurts us. Especially when we try to connect with those parts of ourselves but other people delegitimize our identity because of a language barrier we are not responsible for.

And before a grade A piece of Shit decides to chime in with “teach yourself” :

1. learning a new language is incredibly hard especially without assistance.

2. Many of us don’t have easy access to quality language learning resources for our mother tongues. 

3. In regards to colonized people, of the easily accessible resources,  most of them are the European versions of the language and not the language of the people. Which means you end up sounding like a stranger.

So yeah, nothing is funny about this at all.

Additional Points:

4. White people are rewarded for learning/speaking more than one language. People of color are ridiculed for that same thing, especially if it impacts any part of their English. A lot of migrant parents think they are protecting us when they don’t teach us our native languages; They think if we only learn English, if we don’t pick up their accent, we might have an easier time in this racist society. Unfortunately, they’re usually right.

5. Learning a new language, especially as an adult, is extremely difficult. Add to that learning disabilities, neuroatypicalities, poverty, lack of resources, lack of time, and it’s nearly impossible.

PREACH

(Source: youaremyillusionsoflove, via wreckednervous)

May102014
8AM

nitanahkohe:

U.S. attorneys declined 50 percent of the Native American cases deferred to them between 2005 and 2009, of which 67 percent were sexual abuse and rape related, according to the Native American Bar Association. [source]

(via womanistgrrrlcollective)

March162014

silversarcasm:

When watching a show I don’t think ‘Well politically correctly there should be two more minorities’

I’m thinking ‘This is suffocating, this isn’t what life is like, why do i not exist, why do my friends not exist, what the fuck is with this idealisation of one type of person?’


 

(via releasethebatz)

6PM
be-blackstar:

girlannachronism:

Thom Browne fall 2014 rtw backstage

THIS IS NOT THOM BROWNE’S, THIS IS NOT “LORDE-INSPIRED” 
East African women (and probably other women from that region of the world) have BEEN dying their fingertips 

be-blackstar:

girlannachronism:

Thom Browne fall 2014 rtw backstage

THIS IS NOT THOM BROWNE’S, THIS IS NOT “LORDE-INSPIRED” 

East African women (and probably other women from that region of the world) have BEEN dying their fingertips 

February42014
sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool


 

(via faineemae)

January242014
“You’re drunk in a bathtub
with a red cup full of Birthday Cake flavored vodka
wearing a headdress
made of neon Dollar Store chicken feathers.
You’re half naked in a grassy field
with drugstore lipstick smeared under your eyes
dropping acid
and wearing moccasins from Urban Outfitters.
You can’t wait for Coachella
so you can finally smoke a peace pipe in a tepee
and find your Spirit Animal.
You think Native American culture is so beautiful
and clumsily show it with your
hashtags on tumblr and Instagram.
But when actual Indigenous people tell you that
Gypsy, Squaw and Red Injun are all racist slurs
Headdresses are sacred
and war paint on your white face is insulting
You say
“I’m just appreciating your beautiful culture!
I’m 1/16th Cherokee.”
Ignoring the fact that running around
naked in the woods on shrooms
will not connect you with any tribe
and that your great great great great grandmother
along with the rest of the Cherokee people
never wore headdresses.” "1/16th Cherokee" by sumblr (via calamityjaneporter)

(Source: ursulamisandress, via releasethebatz)

January182014
December42013

youngblackandvegan:

thechanelmuse:

Vanessa VanDyke has amazing hair. Point blank. But it’s her hair that may cause her to get expelled from school. Faith Christian Academy in Orlando told the 12-year-old that she has a week to decide if she’s going to cut her hair, straighten it, or get kicked out.

Vanessa has attended Faith Christian Academy since she was in the third grade, but the school’s s code has rules against how students can wear their hair. The handbook reads: “Hair must be a natural color and must not be a distraction,” and goes on to state examples that include, but are not limited to, mohawks, shaved designs and rat tails.

The distraction that the school is probably referring to when it speaks of Vanessa’s hair has to do with bullying and teasing.

From Local 10 News Orlando:

“A distraction to one person is not a distraction to another,” said VanDyke’s mother, Sabrina Kent. “You can have a kid come in with pimples on his face. Are you going to call that a distraction?”

VanDyke said she’s had her large, natural hair all year long, but it only became an issue after the family complained about students teasing her about her hair.

“There have been bullies in the school,” said Kent. “There have been people teasing her about her hair, and it seems to me that they’re blaming her.”

“I’m depressed about leaving my friends and people that I’ve known for a while, but I’d rather have that than the principals and administrators picking on me and saying that I should change my hair,” said VanDyke.

Source.

(via yellowxperil)

October182013
August132013
← Older entries Page 1 of 4